You will use apostrophe with “s” for possessive singular nouns: You will use the apostrophe with the letter “s” in showing possessive form of the singular noun, even if the singular noun is ending with the letter “s”. Unless you want to make your last name possessive, there aren't any circumstances where you would need to add an apostrophe. A good rule of thumb is to pick one system or the other and to use it consistently throughout, and check with your teacher or supervisor to see which form is the preferred one. Another thing is that is one of possessors in compound possessive is personal pronoun. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in Teaching in elementary education from Sam Houston State University and a Master of Arts in curriculum/instruction from the University of Missouri. Apostrophe. Apostrophes have been evading consensus since they were first used in the 1500s to indicate omitted letters. Copyright 2020 Leaf Group Ltd. / Leaf Group Education, Explore state by state cost analysis of US colleges in an interactive article, GrammarBook.com: Apostrophes With Words Ending in "S", Illinois Institute of Technology Chicago-Kent College of Law: Apostrophes, Grammar Monster: Using Apostrophes to Show Possession. We only have an apostrophe after the S in dogs because dogs is a plural noun ending in S. We cannot say: Where are the dogs’s bones? For example: If possessive noun is being followed by appositive, the word explaining the noun or the words that renames, an apostrophe plus the letter “s” should be added to appositive and not on the noun. If your last name feels really confusing, ending with a ‘ys,’ like in “Mays” or “Humphreys,” don’t panic—the rule is always the same. For most names, you add an apostrophe and an “s” to make the possessive form. If you want possessive of pluralized family name, you need to pluralize the first and simply make name possessive using the apostrophe. (It means that expectations of them are different. You need to use the best formula and stay consistent all the time. This situation can get a little tricky, because there is actually no hard-and-fast rule about apostrophe use for nouns ending with “s.” Some people hold that only the apostrophe should be added, without the extra “s,” like in “Charles’ book.” Others say to add the “s,” so that it reads “Charles’s book.” Still others differentiate by the sound of the final letter, adding only the apostrophe if the letter makes a “z” sound -- James’ or Lourdes’ -- and using both the apostrophe and the “s” if the letter makes the “s” sound -- Lucas’s or Agnes’s. For instance: There you have the rules on how to use apostrophe so that you will be guided whenever you will write something. Just like other plural nouns, names that have been pluralized need only the apostrophe -- no added “s” -- to make them possessive, and you pluralize the names even if they already end in “s.” For example, you would write about the “Joneses’ house” when speaking of the family’s house, instead of “Jones’ house,” which refers to just one person named Jones. Smiths’ car, Joneses’ home. You should, of course, observe your publisher’s or instructor’s requirements. Later, printers started using them for possessives. It is also important to know about rules in using apostrophes in names so that you will not have a hard time in writing. When it comes to compound possessives, the placement of the apostrophe will depend whether nouns are acting together or separately. Cecilia’s and Danny’s old cars are in their basement. The possessive which is indicated by the letter “s” belong to entire phrase and not just to Cecilia.). Contractions. Don’t change the spelling of your last name and don’t add an apostrophe. She has written newsletter articles and curricula-related materials. Confused? The rules for using apostrophes with names are basically the same as those for all other nouns. Contractions (e.g., let’s, don’t, couldn’t, it’s, she’s) have a bad reputation.Many argue that they have no place at all in formal writing. (This tells that Cecilia and Danny are sharing ownership on the card. The apostrophe ( ’ ) has three uses: contractions, plurals, and possessives. Dogs’ bones, with only an apostrophe after the S, means… the bones of the dogs (dogs plural). If you want to know more about using apostrophes with names, this page will guide you. Copyright © 2020 Apostrophe Checker - All Rights Reserved, Cookies are used on this website to improve your user experience, Apostrophes in Plurals: Things to Remember, Everything You Wanted to Know about Apostrophe, 10 Apostrophe Rules That Will Get You out of Grammar Perpetual Stupor, Children’s clothes ( the clothes belongs to the children), Women’s meeting (the meeting belongs to the women). What you only need to do is to add apostrophes in plurals such as the Chambers’. Read on to discover all the apostrophe rules you'll ever need to know! Keep in mind that you need to make constructions with caution or you end up that looks silly. Here is another example to understand compound possessives in terms of names. Proper punctuation can make a big difference in the meaning of words, phrases and sentences, sometimes with hilarious results. Today, apostrophes have a few important functions, but the rules can get tricky - even for experienced writers. Never put the apostrophe before or after the ‘s’. You must get Peter Garcia, the lawyer’s signature. Apostrophes should only be used to show the ownership or belonging of something. Knowing the rules will help you not to have a difficult time. You would not use an apostrophe to explain that there were four Sams at the party. No, this is NOT correct. You will use apostrophe without the letter “s” for possessives of plural nouns: In forming possessive of plural noun that is already ending with the letter “s”, you will only need to add the apostrophe. Apostrophes in Names Rules. Apostrophe rules can be broken into four main categories. The rules for using apostrophes with names are basically the same as those for all other nouns. To shorten decades, replace the century with an apostrophe and add an ‘s’ at the end of the number. Let’s look at these apostrophe rules with examples of each one in action. Usually, if the last name is ending with hard “z”, you will not add “-es” or “s”. For example, “roses” are more than one rose, while “rose’s” means of or belonging to a single rose, like “the rose’s thorns.” With names, you would write “Sammy’s toys” to refer to the playthings of one boy. If you are using the names of two different people in a possessive form, you add the apostrophe and the “s” only to the second name -- “Mary and Sally’s red blouses.” If you use one person’s name and a pronoun for the other person, add the apostrophe and “s” only to the name -- “Jimmy’s and her favorite movies.”. Pamela Martin has been writing since 1979. They are not properly used to make nouns plural, which means showing more than one. The rule is: Plural nouns ending in S… we only add an apostrophe. (It means that every of them have 1 old car and in terms of ownership, it is a separate matter.). You need to put both of the possessors in possessive form or you will make something silly. You signify a separate ownership in writing compounded proper nouns in possessive form.). Martin was an American Society of Newspaper Editors High School Journalism Fellow. For most names, you add an apostrophe and an “s” to make the possessive form. Apostrophe rules also mention that if the family name has ending like x, ch, sh, or z, however, we need to add ‘es’ to form the ending. For your last name, it ends in ‘s,’ so just add the ‘es’: … Only use an apostrophe with last names ending in ‘s’ when they show possession. Use Apostrophes for Possession Only. Apostrophes should only be used to show the ownership or belonging of something. There are check grammar online free tools that you can use to know if you correctly write the apostrophe or not. You will use apostrophe with “s” for possessive singular nouns: You will use the apostrophe with the letter “s” in showing possessive form of the singular noun, even if the singular noun is ending with the letter “s”. Misplaced apostrophes can indicate that one person owns something that really belongs to more than one, or they can turn a plural noun into a possessive. Apostrophes with Names Ending in S. Common nouns: When it comes to grammar rules for apostrophe after s, you should be consistent in writing. Sometimes, this can make the pronunciation a little awkward, but it is important to be clear about whether you’re talking about one or more than one person. She also writes about teaching and crafts. Cecilia and Danny’s old cars are in their basement.